Second annual Roxanna Todd Hodges lecture highlights stroke reduction

Nerses Sanossian, MD, assistant professor of neurology and co-director of the Roxanna Todd Hodges Comprehensive Stroke Clinic and TIA program, introduces 2013 Roxanna Todd Hodges lecturer Cheryl Bushnell, MD, MHS, associate professor of neurology at Wake Forest School of Medicine. (Photo/Amy E. Hamaker)

The second annual Roxanna Todd Hodges Visiting Lectureship in Stroke Prevention and Education was awarded to Cheryl Bushnell, MD, MHS, associate professor of neurology at Wake Forest School of Medicine. Bushnell is director of the Wake Forest Baptist Stroke Center and a thought leader in issues regarding women’s health and stroke, and performing community interventions for reducing stroke risk.

Bushnell’s lecture, “21st Century Stroke Prevention: What will it look like?” was presented at Neurology Grand Rounds held the morning of Aug. 6 at the Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute, part of the Keck School of Medicine of USC.

During the lecture, Bushnell focused on how stroke prevention might be accomplished in the near future if physicians focus on changing the way people behave to lower known risk factors, including hypertension, smoking, obesity, diabetes, alcohol and cardiac causes.

“We know from large studies that these are the main risk factors in population-attributable risk,” said Bushnell, “and that they can explain about 82 percent of stroke risk.

“We pretty much know what to do to lower the risk,” she continued. “If we could appropriately treat hypertension, for example, we could effectively reduce the risk of stroke in 360,000 people.”

Bushnell’s focus for stroke prevention was on adherence to prescribed medication and treatment routines, and how simply continuing to take their medicine can improve the risk for many patients. Factors that affect adherence can range from negative side effects to medication to the instructions given by and the accessibility of medical personnel.

Twenty-six guests attended a dinner in Bushnell’s honor the previous night at the Los Angeles Athletic Club. The lectureship is part of an integrated vision to provide exceptional education in stroke prevention.

Nerses Sanossian, MD, assistant professor of neurology and co-director of the Roxanna Todd Hodges Comprehensive Stroke Clinic and TIA Program, introduced Bushnell before she began, and presented her with a plaque and a token of appreciation. “We are honored to have such a distinguished lecturer receive this award that supports the mission of the Roxanna Todd Hodges Foundation, to reduce the burden of stroke in Southern California through prevention and education,” he said.

University of Southern California – The Weekly August 30, 2013

Roxanna Todd Hodges inaugural lecture examines kidney disease and stroke risk link

From Keck School of Medicine of USC, Wednesday, August 23, 2012

Dr. Bruce Ovbiagele, professor of neuroscience at the University of California, San Diego, gave the first Roxanna Todd Hodges Visiting Lectureship in Stroke Prevention and Education on July 31, 2012. Dr. Ovbiagele examined the connection between  chronic kidney disease and stroke. The lecture was made possible by a $6 million gift from the Roxanna Todd Hodges Foundation to establish the Roxanna Todd Hodges Comprehensive Stroke Clinic and the Roxanna Todd Hodges Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) Program.

Click here to read entire article.

Foundation donates $6 million for stroke clinic

From Keck School of Medicine of USC, Wednesday, May 16, 2012 

The Roxanna Todd Hodges Foundation, which is dedicated to preventing stroke, made a $6 million gift to establish the Roxanna Todd Hodges Comprehensive Stroke Clinic and the Roxanna Todd Hodges Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) Program at the Keck School of Medicine of USC.

“This is an extraordinary gift,” said Keck School of Medicine of USC Dean Carmen A. Puliafito. “The best strategy against it is prevention. I will do whatever I can to make these programs successful and ones that the Roxanna Todd Hodges Foundation can be very proud of.”

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About the Stroke Program

The Keck Medical Center of USC offers a highly specialized level of care and treatment for stroke and other cerebrovascular disorders that is unavailable in many community hospitals. Frequently, community hospitals and primary stroke centers will offer immediate, brain-saving treatment in the emergency department and then transfer the patient to a specialty center for a higher level of care. The Keck Hospital of USC (previously USC University Hospital) provides community hospitals with a tertiary/quaternary transfer option via our Rapid Transport Program for patients presenting with acute stroke. Upon arrival at our hospital, the patient is rapidly admitted to our neurocritical care unit dedicated to patients with severe brain or spine injuries where they can receive cutting edge multi-disciplinary care, specialized procedures and surgeries as needed. The collaboration between stroke neurologists, neurointensivists, neurosurgeons, interventional radiologists, neuroradiologists and vascular surgeons, allows us to offer unique treatment options to our patients, including; endovascular procedures to open a blocked artery, surgery to repair a source of bleeding or to bypass a blockage, and exceptional neurocritical care to prevent and manage life-threatening complications.

Read the full story on the Keck website.

Nerses Sanossian, MD, FAHA Appointed Director, Roxanna Todd Hodges Comprehensive Stroke Clinic

Dr. Nerses Sanossian is Assistant Professor of Neurology and Associate Director of the Neurocritical Care/Stroke Section at the University of Southern California. His research interests are in prehospital stroke therapies, vascular cognitive impairment, lipids/lipoproteins and stroke prevention in underserved populations. He was born in Beirut, Lebanon and grew up in Southern California. He is a graduate of UC San Diego, and obtained his medical degree from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx. He completed residency in Neurology at Albert Einstein in the Bronx, and returned to Los Angeles for fellowship in Vascular Neurology at the UCLA Stroke Center. His is research in lipids and stroke has been funded by the American Heart Association and the Zumberge foundation. Dr. Sanossian serves as an investigator in clinical trials of stroke care and has published over 100 papers and abstracts. He serves as a spokesperson and grant reviewer for the American Heart Association, and as director of fellowship training in Vascular Neurology at USC. Dr. Sanossian was recently awarded the Keck School of Medicine excellence in teaching award.

Read more about Dr. Sanossian.